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  • Japanese Cultural Center Of Hawaii (JCCH) - The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawaii DVD Now on Sale

The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawaii DVD Now on Sale!

Following a world premier at the Hawaii International Film Festival (HIFF) and sold-out screenings across the state, The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i is now available on DVD.

Produced by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, The Untold Story is the first full-length documentary to chronicle the internment experience of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i. While the story of mass internment of Japanese Americans in California, Oregon and Washington has been well documented, very little is known about the internees and confinements sites in Hawai‘i.

Shortly after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawai‘i authorities arrested several hundred local Japanese on O‘ahu, Maui, Hawai‘i island and Kaua‘i. Within 48 hours those arrested included: Buddhist priests, Japanese language school officials, newspaper editors, business and community leaders. In total, over 2,000 men and women of Japanese ancestry were arrested, detained and interned in Hawai‘i. There was no evidence of espionage or sabotage and no charges were ever filed against them. This film chronicles their story through oral histories, documents, interviews, and reenactments.

This project was funded, in part, by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. Additional support was provided by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, Island Insurance Foundation, The Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation, and the Japanese American Citizens League - Honolulu Chapter.

The JCCH Gift Shop is open from Tuesday through Friday 10:00 am -- 4:00 pm and Saturdays 9:00 am -- 4:00 pm. For more information, please call (808) 945-7633.

Price $24.95; $22.45 for JCCH members.
Shipping rates included on order form.
An all-regions DVD
Approx. 57 minutes. English and Japanese with English subtitles.

Click here to download an order form.

Also Available:

Life Behind Barbed Wire: The World War II Internment Memoirs of a Hawaii Issei

Author: Soga, Yasutaro

Yasutaro Soga's Life behind Barbed Wire (Tessaku seikatsu) is an exceptional firsthand account of the incarceration of a Hawai‘i Japanese during World War II. On the evening of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Soga, the editor of a Japanese-language newspaper, was arrested along with several hundred other prominent Issei ( Japanese immigrants) in Hawai‘i. After being held for six months on Sand Island, Soga was transferred to an Army camp in Lordsburg, New Mexico, and later to a Justice Department camp in Santa Fe. He would spend just under four years in custody before returning to Hawai‘i in the months following the end of the war.
Most of what has been written about the detention of Japanese Americans focuses on the Nisei experience of mass internment on the West Coast--largely because of the language barrier immigrant writers faced. This translation, therefore, presents us with a rare Issei voice on internment, and Soga's opinions challenge many commonly held assumptions about Japanese Americans during the war regarding race relations, patriotism, and loyalty.

Although centered on one man's experience, Life behind Barbed Wire benefits greatly from Soga's trained eye and instincts as a professional journalist, which allowed him to paint a larger picture of those extraordinary times and his place in them. The Introduction by Tetsuden Kashima of the University of Washington and Foreword by Dennis Ogawa of the University of Hawai‘i provide context for Soga's recollections based on the most current scholarship on the Japanese American internment.

Paperback - Price: $26.00 Member price $23.00

Family Torn Apart: The Internment Story of the Otokichi Muin Ozaki Family

Editor: Honda, Gail;

Family Torn Apart is the gripping story of one Hawai‘i family's World War II odyssey. Otokichi Ozaki, a Japanese immigrant, was a Japanese language school teacher, tankapoet, and anthurium grower and also a leader of the Japanese community in the city of Hilo on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. A devoted family man, he and his Hawai‘i-born wife, Hideko, had four children ranging in age from two to eight when war broke out. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, he was one of several hundred immigrant community leaders to be arrested, beginning a long journey for Ozaki and his family. Based on letters, poetry, and radio scripts in the collection of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, and translated here for the first time, Family Torn Apart traces Ozaki's incarceration at eight different detention camps, his family's life in Hawai‘i without him, their decision to ‘voluntarily' enter Mainland detention camps in the hope of reuniting, and their subsequent frustration as that reunion bogged down in red tape and government apathy. Relying on Japanese language primary sources, Family Torn Apart brings alive the Japanese immigrant perspective on the World War II incarceration, intergenerational relations, and life under martial law in Hawai‘i. It is a stirring story of the human spirit in difficult times and a cautionary tale for future generations. 36 illustrations.

Distributed by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i
Paperback - Price: $26.00 Member price $23.00




ABOUT JAPANESE CULTURAL CENTER OF HAWAII
The Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i (JCCH), a non-profit organization, strives to share the history, heritage and culture of the evolving Japanese American experience in Hawai‘i. Located at 2454 South Beretania Street in Mō‘ili‘ili, the Cultural Center features a Community and Historical Gallery, Resource Center, Kenshikan martial arts dōjō, Seikōan Japanese teahouse and Gift Shop. The Cultural Center presents various programs, festivals and exhibitions throughout the year.

Motto
Honoring our heritage. Embracing our diversity. Sharing our future.

Vision
We aspire to co-create a society where a deeper knowledge of one's heritage and a profound understanding of oneself will enable enlightened connections among all people.



Mission Statement
To be a vibrant resource, strengthening our diverse community by educating present and future generations in the evolving Japanese American experience in Hawai‘i. We do this through relevant programming, meaningful community service and innovative partnerships that enhance the understanding and celebration of our heritage, culture and love of the land. To guide us in this work we draw from the values found in our Japanese American traditions and the spirit of Aloha.


History
The seeds of thought and planning which had since developed into the solid concrete of Phase I and the working committees of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i were sown over two generations ago. Minds and hearts of Issei and Nisei (first and second generations) forebearers set themselves to the tasks of survival, later to national heroism, and later still to the responsibility of restoring the concept of cultural pride in themselves and their community. Emotions generated by the Kanyaku Imin (125 Years of Japanese In Hawai‘i) celebration in February of 1985 spurred the devotion of major Japanese groups in the community to initially conceptualize the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai'i.

In 1986, The Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce (HJCC) initiated the Japan-Hawaii Cultural Center project, "The Dream," for the purpose of bringing together related organizations in Hawai‘i to work in a common effort to preserve the legacy and history of the pioneers who came to Hawaii from Japan, and whose sacrifices and contributions made it possible for the younger generations to become integral members of American society. It was planned to be a legacy where future members of our community could look back and be fully conscious of their roots. The Center would also foster relations by promoting harmony and mutual understanding between Japan, Hawai‘i, and the United States.

The Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce was willing to accept the enormous responsibility of immortalizing and cultivating the legacy of the Japanese in Hawai‘i by making a commitment to plant and nourish the seedling. Many community organizations supported the creation of a Japanese cultural center, as indicated by a survey to assess the need and expectations for a center.

Courses of action plans were implemented to create Ad Hoc Committees composed of the various Japan related organizations, and to organize a fund-raising organization to raise funds from the community within the State of Hawai‘i as well as in Japan. Committees set in motion to carefully plan, develop, and research in establishing the Cultural Center. The inception of some committees were: Steering, Planning, Public Relations, Historical Research Program, Program, Membership and Property Management. A schedule of "Milestone" tasks for these committees were implemented to prepare for the tremendous work that lay ahead in the formation of the Cultural Center.

On May, 28, 1987, the birth of a new direction and a new step toward the dreams of our forefathers emerged as the Cultural Center was incorporated under the laws of the State of Hawai‘i as a non-profit corporation to develop, own, maintain, and operate a Japanese cultural center in Hawai‘i. As an independent entity, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i would play a most crucial role in perpetuating the cultural heritage we inherited from our Issei forefathers into the lifestyles and values of our children's children.

Revamped, Revved and Ready... the Cultural Center Boards and staff moves forward with great aspirations
The Board of Directors consists of 15 community leaders from O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i counties who lead the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i by establishing policies and strategic direction. Each Director either chairs and /or is a member of the Executive Committee, Governance Committee, Membership Development Committee, Fundraising Committee, Facilities & Operations Committee, and Budget & Finance Committee. The Board members are elected by the membership as a whole.

The Board of Governors currently has forty (40) members who advise and make recommendations to the Board of Directors, and oversee the implementation of programs and activities of the Cultural Center. The Board of Governors also assist and maintain the fiscal well-being of the Center by supporting its fundraising activities. The Board of Governors are appointed by the Board of Directors.

The staff of nine full-time and two part-time employees is led by the President & Executive Director who administers the day-to-day operations of the Cultural Center.

The Board of Directors, Board of Governors and the staff, and volunteers work in unison to carry out the many exciting plans at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. When put together these individuals, though all unique in their background, create a dynamic, capable and passionate group who are dedicated to the Cultural Center's mission of sharing the history, heritage and culture of the evolving Japanese American experience in Hawai‘i.

HOURS
Community & Historical Gallery and Gift Shop: Tuesday -- Saturday, 10 a.m. -- 4 p.m.
Resource Center: Wednesday -- Friday, 10 a.m. -- 4 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Office: Monday -- Saturday, 8 a.m. -- 4:30 p.m.

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Carole Hayashino
President & Executive Director
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Neil Takekawa
Chief Operating Officer
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KEY WEBSITE LINKS
  • Membership - Join the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai'i as a member today!
  • Education - Our Educational packages combine Historical Gallery tours and Discovery Box interactive sessions
  • Gallery - The JCCH features a unique mixture of historical displays, contemporary art exhibitions and annual sales in its Community Gallery

  • Gift Shop - Find unique Japanese antiques and collectibles, including kimono, Japanese dolls, tea sets and woodblock prints.
  • Giving - The Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i depends on donations from the community to support our mission of sharing the history, heritage and culture of the evolving Japanese American experience in Hawai‘i.
  • Volunteers - volunteers to achieve its mission of educating the public of the ever-changing Japanese American experience in Hawai‘i.
  • Resources - The Resource Center seeks to serve the community by providing public access to a repository of resources about the evolving Japanese American experience in Hawai'i
  • Facilities - Professionally designed to evoke the Japanese influence on modern Hawai‘i, the JCCH serves as a gathering place, offering educational programs, services and cultural events to the community-at-large.
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  • Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i (JCCH)
    Honoring our heritage. Embracing our dirversity. Sharing our future. The Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i (JCCH), a non-profit organization, strives to share the history, heritage and culture of the evolving Japanese American experience in Hawai‘i.
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